Planter's Diary

Lifescapes

September 13th, 2013 by Ganesh H. R.

The Multifaceted Wood

‘Rosewood’ refers to a number of richly hued timbers, often brownish, but found in many different hues. All rosewoods are strong and heavy, taking an excellent polish, being suitable for guitars, furniture, luxury flooring, and so on. Rosewood oil is used in perfume.  This wood has a strong sweet scent, which persists over the years, explaining the name “rosewood”.

Rosewood Furniture at Coorg

Rosewood Furniture

‘Rosewood’ is found practically all throughout Coorg, and mainly on plantations. This is on account of the fact that Coorg possesses the conditions conducive for the rosewood tree to thrive here. This tree performs an important role on coffee plantations by providing the requisite shade to coffee plants.

The shoots of this tree, growing out of its roots are used to grow more trees.  A surprising fact about this tree is that it takes half a century to grow to its full size!

Rosewood at Coorg

Rosewood – the Exotic Wood

Musical instruments such as guitars, drums, ‘sitars’, violins and pianos are made from Rosewood. Guitars made out of Rosewood are known to produce good music. The great composer Mozart played on a piano made of rosewood.

The Maharajas who ruled Karnataka in ancient times had jewelry boxes made out of rosewood. Also, Swamijis (God-men) in the days of yore wore Rosewood slippers!

Rosewood is today used to make picture frames and paint brushes. It is also used to make wooden cases that wealthy golf players use to keep their golf balls.

The Multifaceted Wood
Ganesh H. R.
How often do you encounter someone who has a live birdsong for a mobile ring tone? How much rarer to meet someone who can imitate bird calls and insect sounds so convincingly that you are hard pressed to tell the difference between original and copy? Meet Ganesh, our resident Naturalist. Let him take you on a tour of our plantation animatedly explaining the hallmarks of Arabica and Robusta coffees, the subtle dynamics of pepper harvesting, the traces left by foraging wild elephants and boars, while, in between, calling out to a swallow in his own brand of bird language. "Enchantment unlimited", is how we would be prone to put it!



This entry was posted on Friday, September 13th, 2013 at 1:42 PM and is filed under Destination, Plantation. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Leave a Reply