Planter's Diary

Lifescapes

March 29th, 2014 by Ganesh H. R.

Pepper Harvest Time!

Pepper harvesting commences immediately after coffee harvesting (carried on each year during the month of Feb-Mar), and continues until mid-April. The harvesters use a natural bamboo ladder to pluck pepper.

Pepper Harvesting, Coorg

A Pepper Harvester

The pepper vine is taken during monsoons to be planted in a plantation close to a tree, and grows along the tree. The first yield is obtained after 5 years. The person harvesting pepper separates the green pepper catkins from the creeper. The pepper vine gives rise to four different types of pepper: green pepper (which turns black on drying), red pepper, white pepper, and black pepper.

Harvested Pepper, Coorg

Harvested Pepper

Pepper is then de corned. The pepper seeds are removed from the catkins. Pepper is then dried on the terracotta tiled ground. It is dried for around 8 days. Following this, the pepper is packed and then sold in the market. Buyers are approached for the purchase of pepper.

Pepper is also known as the black gold of the world. It is also called the king of spices, cardamom being the queen of spices 🙂

Any ‘peppery’ tales from your end? 🙂

Pepper Harvest Time!
Ganesh H. R.
How often do you encounter someone who has a live birdsong for a mobile ring tone? How much rarer to meet someone who can imitate bird calls and insect sounds so convincingly that you are hard pressed to tell the difference between original and copy? Meet Ganesh, our resident Naturalist. Let him take you on a tour of our plantation animatedly explaining the hallmarks of Arabica and Robusta coffees, the subtle dynamics of pepper harvesting, the traces left by foraging wild elephants and boars, while, in between, calling out to a swallow in his own brand of bird language. "Enchantment unlimited", is how we would be prone to put it!



This entry was posted on Saturday, March 29th, 2014 at 3:38 PM and is filed under Nature, Plantation, Spice. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

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